Wildlife Science: Connecting Research with Management

Wildlife and conservation biology
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Students graduating in wildlife science prepare for a variety of careers in natural resources, including preparation for graduate school to help launch careers with state agencies, federal land management, regulatory, and research agencies, and numerous private sector enterprises, such as consulting firms, private ranches, private land reclamation firms, and nongovernmental organizations.

Current students are encouraged to visit the Wildland Resources Department homepage for current news and information or the Wildland Resources Department's Undergraduate Programs homepage for additional information. Shelly brings years of experience in academic advising, and her love for the outdoors to help students succeed in their educations and future careers.

Wildlife refers to free-ranging mammals and birdsliving in their natural habitats. The Wildlife Ecology and Management major emphasizes the ecology, behavior, conservation and management of wildlife populations and communities in terrestrial ecosystems. They then focus on a series of courses on specific groups of wildlife birds, reptiles, amphibians, mammals , management of these animal populations, and on human dimensions of wildlife management, including policy and social science.

Below is a sample four year plan. Students should meet regularly with their advisor and carefully plan their academic program, keeping in mind that many upper division courses have prerequisites and must me taken in sequence. Students following the recommended schedule listed below should be able to complete degree requirements in four years or eight semesters.

A grade of C- or better is required for all courses taken in the major department. The grade point average for all courses taught by the Quinney College of Natural Resources must be 2.

So You Want to Be a Wildlife Biologist? | Sierra Club

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Environment and Society. Watershed Sciences. Wildland Resources. Organizations Council Professional Events. One thing we currently lack good data on, however, is exactly how many young professionals will be needed to meet future needs. The TWS and CNRS studies cited the need to obtain more accurate data on projected future personnel needs of state and federal wildlife agencies, academia, conservation NGOs, consulting companies, professional and scientific societies, zoological parks and aquariums, and others who hire natural resource professionals.

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Jordan: What are some of the trends that are likely to impact the wildlife profession in the coming decades? What implications do they have for how we train future wildlife professionals? Michael: In and , I took the lead in organizing and co-moderating two meetings intended to address these issues.

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Wildlife Science: Connecting Research with Management - CRC Press Book. Wildlife Science: Connecting Research with Management. 1st Edition. Joseph P. Sands, Stephen J. DeMaso, Matthew J. Schnupp, Leonard A.

There are many trends currently underway in our world, and, unfortunately, none of them are good for native wildlife and their habitats, or for the wildlife profession Hutchins, M. What the future holds: Challenges for the profession and TWS. The Wildlife Professional 6 3 : We have spoken about many of these in our previous interviews. Furthermore, this comes at a time that global climate change is altering the very nature of these habitats, with some areas becoming colder and wetter and some warmer and dryer, resulting in pervasive changes in vegetation and altering entire ecosystems.

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A failure to control or eliminate the most destructive or these organisms will surely result in numerous extinctions of native wildlife. How will we prepare future professionals to address these issues? What kinds of specific knowledge and practical experience will they need to confront these increasingly complex challenges? There are many other relevant trends in society and education, including changing demographics. Yet, the natural resource professions like many others are not attracting a representative diversity of students or young professionals and this could be highly problematic Unger, K.

Exploring diversity in the wildlife profession. The Wildlife Professional 1 4 : How seriously will people absorb the message of science-based conservation if it always given by people who do not look like them, speak like them, or have no knowledge of the subtle idiosyncrasies of their cultures? Why diversity matters.

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The Wildlife Professional 5 2 : Unfortunately, students that have a propensity for the biological sciences are often pulled away into high-paying positions in human medicine and biotechnology. Changes in academia are also problematic. This is making it more difficult for students to gain a detailed knowledge of organismal biology, so critical to formulating effective wildlife management and conservation strategies.

Generational differences may also impact the number of students who choose to go into the natural resource fields. Many government agency cultures are traditionally top-down, hierarchical and inflexible in nature and innovation and novel approaches to problem-solving are often discouraged.

Of course, there are real benefits to working in the natural resource fields and these should certainly be communicated to potential students. Some of these include intellectual challenge, travel, interesting colleagues, time spent outdoors in nature, and an opportunity to make a real difference for the future of life on our planet. What skills do you think a wildlife biologist entering the field may need that probably surprises the general public and even students in wildlife science disciplines?

Michael: Yes, one can be an excellent biologist with a deep understanding of biological science and still be a lousy wildlife conservationist or manager. Indeed, to be effective, knowledge must go beyond the theoretical and into practical application. Future wildlife conservationists and mangers will need to know how to address the major challenges outlined above.

Some of the solutions will necessitate their having a deep knowledge of ecology and organismal biology, but it will also involve the practical application of that knowledge to real-life problem-solving. A look at wildlife education in the United States.

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Choosing the appropriate scale of reserves for conservation. Identifying and prioritizing greater sage-grouse nesting and brood-rearing habitat for conservation in human-modified landscapes. Riverine and early marine survival of stocked salmon smolts, Salmo salar L. Brower, L. Animal movement can be described according to three major population-level distribution strategies that include being sedentary in annual ranges, migration and nomadism Mueller and Fagan, The Journal Of Wildlife Management , 1 , 1. There is a lot of research going on there, but most of it might not be in a formal internship, but rather helping out with a research projects.

Wildlife Society Bulletin Human attitudes and perceptions of wildlife are often key factors when developing effective conservation strategies e. Communication and consensus-building are key elements to the success of modern conservation. Combined with the growing disconnect between people and their environment i.

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One needs only look to the current societal conflict over the control of native white-tailed deer and non-native feral domestic cats and horses and to get an inkling of where this might lead us. None of it will be good for our native wildlife or their habitats. There is also a need for greater collaboration among colleagues. The complexity of modern conservation makes cooperation among various disciplinary specialists increasingly necessary. Biologists may need to work in teams with economists, anthropologists, psychologists, media experts, and others in order to reach their ultimate goals.

Furthermore, wildlife scientists and resource managers need to get on the same page. Often the language of science is too technical and sometimes too difficult to understand for non-scientists. Thus scientists need to get better at both explaining the results of their research and its practical applications. Some of these include intellectual challenge, travel, interesting colleagues, time spent outdoors in nature, and an opportunity to make a real difference for the future of life on our planet. What skills do you think a wildlife biologist entering the field may need that probably surprises the general public and even students in wildlife science disciplines?

Michael: Yes, one can be an excellent biologist with a deep understanding of biological science and still be a lousy wildlife conservationist or manager. Indeed, to be effective, knowledge must go beyond the theoretical and into practical application.

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Future wildlife conservationists and mangers will need to know how to address the major challenges outlined above. Some of the solutions will necessitate their having a deep knowledge of ecology and organismal biology, but it will also involve the practical application of that knowledge to real-life problem-solving. A look at wildlife education in the United States.

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Wildlife Society Bulletin Human attitudes and perceptions of wildlife are often key factors when developing effective conservation strategies e. Communication and consensus-building are key elements to the success of modern conservation. Combined with the growing disconnect between people and their environment i. One needs only look to the current societal conflict over the control of native white-tailed deer and non-native feral domestic cats and horses and to get an inkling of where this might lead us.

7 Beginner’s Tips for a Wildlife Biology Career

None of it will be good for our native wildlife or their habitats. There is also a need for greater collaboration among colleagues. The complexity of modern conservation makes cooperation among various disciplinary specialists increasingly necessary. Biologists may need to work in teams with economists, anthropologists, psychologists, media experts, and others in order to reach their ultimate goals.

Furthermore, wildlife scientists and resource managers need to get on the same page.