The Orphan Tsunami of 1700: Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America

Show Notes: The Orphan Tsunami
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The Orphan Tsunami of 1700: Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America

Close mobile search navigation Article Navigation. Volume Atwater, et al Matthew Mulcahy. Oxford Academic.

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It underlines the surprising connectedness of the North Pacific-- Japan may be many thousands of miles away, but just as tsunami wreckage washes up on our shores, so too does our seismic activity affect them. Jul 13, Julie added it Shelves: nonfiction , reading-bingo , author-male. Showing The researchers knew that a tsunami speeding across the Pacific Ocean travels at jetliner speed—about mph—and it would take about 10 hours for a tsunami originating in Cascadia to reach Japan. Green Library. Hiragana From Zero! Joan Christoffersen rated it it was amazing Oct 01,

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BOOK: Orphan Tsunami of 1700

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This orphan tsunami would not be linked to its parent earthquake until the of —Japanese clues to a parent earthquake in North America. The Orphan Tsunami of Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America. Brian F. Atwater, Satoko Musumi-Rokkaku, Kenji Satake, Yoshinobu.

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Sign in via your Institution Sign in. The result is a very detailed reconstruction of a historical tsunami that could probably be easily given to an undergraduate or advanced high-school audience. The report is divided into three sections.

The Orphan Tsunami of 1700: Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America

The first presents the geological evidence for a massive Cascadia earthquake and local tsunami, accompanied with related folklore accounts presenting a potential Native American memory of the event. Much of the second and third sections compare the Cascadia event to the Chile earthquake and tsunami, as the authors have taken the latter as a model for the former.

Oddly, for a work aimed at a general audience, the information about the Japanese documents is very detailed, including images of many primary sources, some of them glossed word-for-word. While glossing the documents instead of translating them makes them harder to parse for a general reader, this presentation means that this book could almost be used as an introduction to certain types of early modern Japanese sources.

July Evening Public Lecture 2015- The Giant Cascadia Earthquake of January 26, 1700

Also present in this report, although not as emphasized, is some of the background behind the study of historical earthquakes and tsunami in Japan, which has also benefited from a long-standing collaboration between historians both academic and amateur and seismologists in Japan. Additional readings:.

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